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Economic Diplomacy in a Changing World by Maxime Verhagen and Henk Bleker in HJD

Revenge of the mainstream? Veronica Rappoport in the Journal of Economic Literature

Veronica Rappoport of Columbia University published a 2+ page review in the Journal of Economic Literature. Vol. XLIX (September 2011), 747-9 The review is highly critical and thus recommended for further reading: 
... he consciously maintains an intuitive analysis, avoiding overtheoretical arguments and overlooking thoroughness in favor of clarity in the empirical sections. This goal is not always achieved; important points are often ignored or lost in spurious details, and the most up-to-date evidence is either absent or misrepresented. As a result, this book fails to serve as a survey on the empirical work on the Great Trade Collapse or as a bridge between scholarly work and the general audience.The review gives three concrete examples of literature that was not included:

Chor, Davin, and Kalina Manova. 2010. “Off the Cliff and Back? Credit Conditions and International Trade during the Global Financial Crisis.” National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper 16174.Haddad, Mona, An…

Disdier and Marette,Globalization Issues and Consumers’ Purchase Decisions for Food Products: Evidence from a Lab Experiment, EAAE 2011 Congress, Zurich

For example, 43% of respondents to the Eurobarometer public opinion surveys published by the European Commission in autumn 2008 think that globalization represents a threat to employment and companies in the European Union (European Commission, 2008). This negative feeling combined with the 2008 financial crisis led to fears of new protectionism (van Bergeijk, 2010).

Economic History

The one is not enough paper that attacks the consensus view explaining that that consensus is right for the 1930s but wrong for the 2000s was presented at the European Historical Economics Society (Dublin September 2011) and the INFER workshop on the Economic History of Globalization (Leuven, October 2011)

This is not your grandfather's global trade collapse

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Gartner and Jung Clothes for the Emperor or Can Research Learn from Undergraduate Macroeconomics? (Kyklos)

We ignore the negative effect of a global recession on a small open economy's exports, to keep things simple, and because this does not bear on our qualitative results. Van Bergeijk (2009) provides a quantification of this channel by looking at how major post 1980 financial crises affected import volumes of individual economies.